Main Content

Campus Tour
Campus
Outside
Greek singing

The Dean of Students is a member of the Student Affairs division.  The Dean of Students unit actively partners with the campus community to provide transformational, holistic programs and services that challenge and empower students to learn, serve, and succeed. We contribute to the mission of the University by offering programs, services, and support, and by making referrals, all with student learning and success at the core of our work.    

Units reporting to the Dean of Students include: Inclusive Excellence, Night Safety Transit, Non-Traditional Student Services, Saluki Cares, Students' Legal Assistance, Student Multicultural Resource Centers (Black, LGBTQ, Hispanic, and Women’s Resource Centers), Student Rights and Responsibilities, and Veterans Services.

IMPORTANT INFORMATION CONCERNING DEFERRED ACTION FOR CHILDHOOD ARRIVALS

YOUR DACA IS VALID UNTIL ITS EXPIRATION DATE

DACA and work permits (Employment Authorization Documents) will remain valid until its expiration date.  To determine when your DACA and work permit expires, look at your I-795 Approval Notice and the bottom of your Employment Authorization Document (EAD).

NO NEW DACA APPLICATIONS WILL BE ACCEPTED

United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) no longer will accept or process first-time applications after September 5, 2017.

ADVANCE PAROLE TO TRAVEL ABROAD IS NO LONGER AVAILABLE.

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) will no longer grant DACA recipients permission to travel abroad through Advance Parole.  Any pending applications for Advance Parole will not be processed and DHS will refund any associated fees.

DACA ISSUANCES AND WORK PERMITS EXPIRING BETWEEN NOW AND MARCH 5, 2018 MUST BE SUBMITTED FOR RENEWAL BY OCTOBER 5, 2017.

If you have a permit that will expire between now and March 5, 2018, you must apply for a two-year renewal of your DACA by October 5, 2017.

ANYONE NEEDING ASSISTANCE IN FILING DACA ISSUANCES AND WORK PERMITS

Please contact Becca Tally, the Co-chair of Southern Illinois Immigrant Rights Project

618-713-7582

becca.tally@gmail.com

HAVE SPECIFIC QUESTIONS?

Please contact Dr. Rene Poitevin, Coordinator, Hispanic/Latino Resource Center

618-453-2126

rfpoitevin@siu.edu

DACA Students:

 Do not carry around your passport

  1. Carry state or city issued ID
  2. Ensure  a trusted person has your alien registration number
  3. Keep all immigration documents in a safe space
  4. Memorize the phone number of a trusted family member or friend

Statement on Cheerleader Protests

Chancellor Carlo Montemagno

I have received a great deal of feedback following the decision by some of our cheerleaders to kneel during the national anthem during two home football games. Many say that students should not be allowed to disrespect the most important symbols of our country, especially while representing SIU.

I understand these views and am grateful to all of those who have reached out on both sides of a national concern that has found a voice at SIU.

I believe that, as a public university whose students, faculty and staff benefit from state and national support, SIU as an institution should encourage its stakeholders to show appropriate respect for two of our nation’s most important symbols.

But while we can encourage this respect, we cannot dictate it.

In fact, the two symbols that are the focus of these peaceful protests stand for one of our most important Constitutional rights: freedom of speech. We may not agree with how these students are choosing to make their statements, but we must morally and legally protect their right to make them.

Late Supreme Court justice Antonin Scalia once said in an interview: “If I were king, I would not allow people to go around burning the American flag. However, we have a First Amendment which says that the right of free speech shall not be abridged -- and it is addressed in particular to speech critical of the government.”

He went on to say: “Burning the flag is a form of expression -- speech doesn’t just mean written words or oral words. Burning a flag is a symbol that expresses an idea. ‘I hate the government, the government is unjust,’ whatever.”

Taking a knee is also a symbolic expression of ideas – an expression made possible under the very rights our flag and national anthem stand for. For this reason, the university must allow our students the right to express themselves peacefully.

As an educational institution, we can help students find constructive ways to engage the campus in dialog about issues of importance. I have invited the cheerleaders to think about ways students can work with us to help build programming about racial inequalities in order to contribute to awareness and understanding. I look forward to their input. 

Get Involved! 

Want to become more involved on campus? Search for over 400 Registered Student Organizations.

Report Hazing

A hazing incident may be reported ANONYMOUSLY to the Dean of Students office by anyone. If you have witnessed or have knowledge of a possible hazing incident, report the incident immediately to Dean of Students and/or the police. Hazing is illegal in IL, violates SIU Code of Conduct & violates all student organization's policies! 

If you are not sure if it is hazing, then it probably is! 

Report hazing by clicking here

Report Sexual Assault